Category

Preparing For Retirement

What are the best investments for your retirement?

By | Financial advice, Preparing For Retirement, Retirement | No Comments

In the simplest terms, investing your money means buying an asset with the expectation of earning returns from ownership of that asset. If you own an investment property, for example, you can expect to receive rent as income. But if you then sell the property for a higher price than you paid, you’ve increased your returns from your asset even more.  This is known as a capital gain – the growth in value of an asset over time.

Different types of investments are grouped together into asset classes – a group of investments with similar characteristics, such as term deposits, bonds, property or shares/equities. When it comes to choosing between different investment options, they generally fall into two broad categories, defensive and growth assets.

Defensive assets offer less opportunity for growth, but more stability and security for your original investment. A term deposit is an example of a defensive asset – the interest you’ll earn is fixed but you’re guaranteed to get your original deposit back at the end of the term. Growth assets, such as shares, carry more risk but offer more potential to grow your wealth over time.

Why diversification is important

When choosing growth assets and defensive assets to invest in you’re looking at how much you can expect to earn compared with the risk of losing some of the original sum invested. Diversifying your investments can be a good way to strike a balance between risk and reward. Because different asset classes behave differently at different times, spreading your money across a number of assets can help you earn more stable investment returns overall.

Investing costs

Every type of investment comes with costs. For buying and selling shares, you’ll pay brokerage fees for each transaction. When you buy and own property, there are upfront and ongoing costs such as stamp duty, agency fees and maintenance costs. Plus, you’ll be liable for tax on the income from your investments and on any capital gain you earn when you sell assets. These are all things you need to take into account when looking at different investment options.

Should you invest in a super fund?

You can invest in all sorts of assets outside of super, either directly or through managed funds. Most super funds will also offer a wide range of choices for investing your money, including their own blended investment options, such as growth, conservative (defensive) or balanced.  So should you be investing your retirement savings in super or look elsewhere?

A key benefit of investing through your super fund is the potential savings on the tax on your investment income. Any investment earnings in your super fund are taxed at a maximum rate of 15%, regardless of the marginal tax rate on the rest of your income. The main drawback of investing in super is the money you invest and the investment earnings are locked away until you reach your preservation age and/or meet a condition of release. If you need access to the money you’re investing in the short or medium term, then your super fund isn’t the right place for it.

What about SMSFs?

If you’re looking for more flexibility in your choice of investments than you can expect from a super fund, a Self Managed Super Fund (SMSF) could be the answer. However, there are significant costs involved in setting up and managing an SMSF so your freedom to invest super savings in property or collectibles, for example, comes at a price.

Your superannuation investment strategy

There’s no one-size fits all when it comes to investing. Whether it’s your investment strategy for retirement or another purpose, there are lots of personal circumstances and preferences to think about. Some of these include your investment timeframe, your appetite for risk and how much you already know about different types of investments. To find out more please contact us.

Source: FPA Money & Life

Retirement planning in your 50s

By | Financial advice, Preparing For Retirement | No Comments

While planning your retirement can mean different things to different people, more often than not, the type of retirement you can afford comes down to the plans put in place to set yourself up for the future.

How much you may need, how and when you can start accessing your super and having a plan in mind when moving into retirement are all things worth considering.

The first big question you might ask yourself at 50 is ‘how much do I need to retire’ and ‘how long will my money last?’

While a logical question, it’s often a difficult one to answer.  The amount you need will differ depending on the plans you have and the financial resources at your disposal.

You can find many retirement income estimates in financial commentary today, and while not necessarily personalised to your unique circumstances, these can help show the costs you may expect in retirement.

To personalise this approach, one of the simplest ways to estimate your retirement income needs is to take your current expenses and assume you may only need to fund around 70 per cent of these in retirement.

While this method is a broad but useful starting point, it doesn’t really help in determining the savings you need to generate this level of retirement income. It also ignores any other one-off retirement expenses you might expect to incur.

Another method is to take your current annual expenses and then multiply this amount by varying factors depending on the age at which you plan to retire. Taking into account a set of assumptions, this method provides you with an estimated capital amount to aim for in order to generate the retirement income you need.

Keep in mind the investment returns your savings generate and your actual level of expenses in retirement will have a notable impact on whether the projection ends up being right for you.

Your superannuation savings

Your 50’s also present an opportunity to start planning how much you may wish to contribute to your savings, repaying debt such as the mortgage against your home, and planning any final super contributions to boost your retirement savings.

Your super provides not only a tax-effective way to save for retirement, but also a tax-effective way to assist funding your retirement income needs once you reach an age at which you can access your accumulated benefits.

While your super is likely to form a cornerstone of your retirement income planning, it doesn’t need to be the only piece of your retirement income plan.  Savings and investments outside of super can also be used to provide you with alternative financial resources for your retirement, often tax effectively with the benefit of tax offsets available to eligible senior Australians.

Repaying as much of your outstanding debts as possible, can make a big difference come retirement.  While building your retirement savings, also consider a plan to proactively clear your debt by redirecting free cash flow to reducing the amount you owe, thereby strengthening your financial position.

After the age of 65, it’s generally those who continue to work who make additional contributions to super, so through your 50’s, have a plan around what final super contributions may mean for you.  While many of the external factors which contribute to the retirement landscape, such as the current regulatory environment or the performance of investment markets, may be outside of your control, focusing on the things you can control will go a long way to getting you the retirement you want.

Source: BT